The Lifespan of a Hummingbird

Athough most hummingbirds live in the wild there are also some that live in capitivity as well.  The ones found in captivity are most likely found at a zoo or aviary exibit.  Have you ever wondered if there is a difference in the lifespan of a hummingbird depending on where they live?  If so, I have the answer for you.

Hummingbirds that live in captivity have a longer lifespan then those hummingbirds which live in the wild.  A hummingbird in captivity can live ten years or longer while those in the wild have a three to five year lifespan.  The diference in the lifespan can be explained by several factors.  The hummingbirds raised in captivity do not have to make long migratory journeys and therefore their feathers don’t ware out as quickly.  Also, these birds don’t have to search for food because their manmade habitat is designed to provide it to provide it to them.  Hummingbirds found in captivity live in a safe and protected environment and so they don’t face predators.  These same things can’t be said for the hummingbirds found in the wild, so their life is far more difficult because they must face  many more hazzards and challanges.  

 

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18 Responses to The Lifespan of a Hummingbird

  • Excellent article, I’m a huge fan of this blog, keep up the great work, and I will be a regular visitor for a very long time.

  • Man this is why I just love the internet…it gives us free valuable information..and when I see posts like this it really makes me happy and thankful to the person who wrote and posted it …thanks so much.

  • Man this is why I just love the internet;it gives us free valuable information..and when I see posts like this it really makes me happy and thankful to the person who wrote and posted it ;thanks so much.

  • Mark Vice says:

    Great post!

  • Great information. Thanks very much.

  • Man this is why I just love the internet;it gives us free valuable information..and when I see posts like this it really makes me happy and thankful to the person who wrote and posted it …thanks so much.

  • I have a slightly different view, but I respect you for posting this story.

  • Interesting blog, thank you!

  • This is an extraordinary blog….from where do you get your content? I`m thinking to start one of my own.

  • Hummingbird says:

    The content comes from having done extensive research on the Internet as well as reading various books on the subject of hummingbirds.

  • Karen Tooze says:

    Thanks very much for this fantastic blog post; this is the kind of thing that keeps me going through the day. I’ve been looking around for your site after I heard about them from a close friend and was thrilled when I was able to find it after searching for some time. Being an avid blogger, I’m pleased to see others taking initiative and contributing to the community. I just wanted to comment to show my appreciation for your work as it’s very encouraging, and many bloggers do not get the credit they deserve. I’m sure I’ll be back and will send some of my friends.

  • I’d like to read more about this posting, thank you.

  • Hummingbird says:

    If you are asking where to find this post, there is a tab located at the top of the blog entitled life span of the hummingbird. If this is not what you are asking then I do not understand what it is that you want to know.

  • Serena Bloyd says:

    This is Awesome! Thank you so much.

  • good post… answered all of my questions

  • I really find that interesting. Been browsing your blog for a couple days now and I truly like what I see. Keep up the great work!

  • Raquel says:

    That’s really interesting… could it be then.. that in places where they do not need to migrate (like here in Brazil), they might have a longer lifespan?

  • Apple now has Rhapsody as an app, which is a great start, but it is currently hampered by the inability to store locally on your iPod, and has a dismal 64kbps bit rate. If this changes, then it will somewhat negate this advantage for the Zune, but the 10 songs per month will still be a big plus in Zune Pass’ favor.

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